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Ports Of Southern Africa

The ports of southern Africa play a most important role in the economies of each country and those of neighbouring landlocked members of the Southern African Development Community (SADC).
 
Approximately 95 percent of all trade to the region passes through these ports and those of East Africa, providing a vital link in the logistic chain that binds southern Africa inextricably together. If one port experiences any sort of delay or interruption the effect is often felt across the entire region.
 
The ports of southern Africa are gradually becoming more settled, with privatisation measures banished (for the present) from South Africa's ports and replaced with largescale government investment and resulting in more efficient cargo handling procedures and improved infrastructure with much improved service levels.
 
At the same time the port structure remains under the ownership of state-owned corporations, providing a sense of stability and assurance particularly among a volatile and influential labour force. The future role of the ports, both independently and inter-dependently of one another, continues to provide a fascinating focus of attention on the future.
 
The following information is provided in good faith merely as a guide to the ports of the region and is kept as accurate as possible. However such information should not be used for purposes such as navigation and readers should endeavour to verify facts and statistics independently for the latest updates. Corrections and updates on the state and condition of each port are always welcome. Please submit these to info@ports.co.za